The New Adventures of Superman – Bugs – Chicago Hope – NYPD Blue – tape 2035

A fun packed Saturday Night on this tape, opening with the end of Big Break Stars of the Future, a snooker-based game show hosted by Jim Davidson, the racist 70s comedian who isn’t a convicted paedophile. Prime Time on BBC1. The 90s were a wasteland.

There’s a trailer for Monkhouse’s Memory Masters, and Steve Wright’s People Show. Look, a man is running around the courtyard in Television Centre putting the lids down on toilet seats. This really happened.

 

Like I said, a wasteland.

But while we’re here, let’s watch The New Adventures of Superman, and an episode called Lucky Leon.

Jimmy is moonlighting as a delivery person. He delivers something to a man in an office. Looks like Amstrad have a subsidiary in Metropolis.

At first, because Jimmy’s dialogue sounds like someone nervous and spinning a story, and I assumed he was working undercover. But no, this was merely clumsy dialogue  put in to explain to the audience why Jimmy would be randomly delivering something. Really clunky writing, and clunky plotting, come to that.

The man receiving the delivery isn’t short of gadgets, He has a phone gizmo inside an attache case, which amusingly he almost pulls out as he pulls on the phone cord.

It’s actually a spy device, and some other gangsters are watching him. I don’t quite know why they need four screens showing the same picture here – maybe the director thought it wouldn’t look like a CCTV rig without them, and couldn’t be bothered to think of something else for the other three screens.

After the bad guys shoot the other (possibly bad) guy with a poison dart, that means Jimmy is a suspect in the murder.

The villain, Lucky Leon, inventor of the Desk Friend, also sells the Bath Friend. He seems to be the same level of inventor as Hoyt Axton in Gremlins, but he already had ‘Bathroom Buddy’ trademarked.

Good grief, a later wide shot reveals there are actually six screens, all still showing the same thing.

 

But never fear, we do finally get a shot where it looks like they are making use of at least some of the extra screens.

There’s some nonsense about nuclear weapons, thrown in at the end, and superman captures the Intergang bad guys, including Robert Culp.

BBC Genome: BBC One – 10th June 1995 – 18:30

After this, a trailer for That’s Showbusiness. And for Michael Jackson The Man and his Music.

There’s a bit of Steve Wright’s People Show in which Zig and Zag perform Smells Like Teen Spirit.

Then recording switches to the end of a National Lottery programme wherein Krishnan Guru Murthy talks to a man who predicted the lottery numbers using a random number generator. Although presumably not all of them, as he only won around £100,000.

Henry Cooper starts the draw.

There’s a trailer for Out of the Blue. And one for Birds of a Feather.

And then, what’s trailed by Anthea Turner as ‘the very final episode of Bugs“. Not sure what she means by that, as this is the final episode of the first season, as should be obvious by Craig MacLachlan’s presence in the titles.

Anton Lesser plays a shady businessman who offers another businessman a takeover deal, and when it’s rejected, blows him up with a rocket launcher – in an office corridor.

This episode is written by Stephen Gallagher.

A friend of Ed’s, Fiona Gillies, is likely to be targeted by the same shady businessman.

And another business has a bomb hit it, just before Lesser approaches them. Beckett stands in as the manager to make the deal.

They use an online backup system, running through a US Robotics modem. Old School.

Next, Gillies is approached, turns down Lesser’s offer, so he kidnaps her daughter. She doesn’t seem too upset, since they’re giving her pizza to eat.

Lesser and his brother are running a scam whereby they knock out large corporations with a missile that sends out an electromagnetic pulse, then the small companies they’ve taken over will move in to take their place.

Nice to see Ros get a bit of an action scene as she jumps on the back of a departing lorry and cuts her way in.

Look, they’ve got touchscreen computers in 1995.

That’s not how you spell Laser.

They’re getting such good value out of their Rocket Launcher prop.

I’ve never seen anybody look as happy as Ros driving an articulated lorry cab.

BBC Genome: BBC One – 10th June 1995 – 20:15

After this, trailers for The Vet and Blackadder Goes Forth.

Then, the start and end of an episode of Birds of a Fevvah.

There’s a trailer for Castles, a dreadful looking middle class soap. And a trail for International Match of the Day.

Then, an episode of Chicago Hope. A former patient has been diagnosed with Ebola, so several members of the hospital staff are put into isolation. Hilarity ensues.

They even contrive to have to perform open heart surgery on one of the quarantinees.

BBC Genome: BBC One – 10th June 1995 – 21:35

After this, recording switches to Channel 4 and the end of en episode of The Nick.

Then, an episode of NYPD Blue. Jimmy Smits and Dennis Franz shout at people.

This is followed by the start of Secret Asia. The tape ends during this programme.

Adverts:

  • trail: True Stories: Tales from a Hard City
  • Peoples Phone
  • Peugeot 306
  • Kodak Gold
  • Axa Equity and Law
  • BT
  • trail: Mister Johnson
  • Vauxhall
  • Peoples Phone
  • House of Fraser
  • Royal Mail
  • Wall’s Too Good To Be True
  • Sony Handycam
  • Ford Acumen
  • Boots Soltan
  • Destiny Turns on the Radio in cinemas
  • Organics
  • Solero
  • Direct Line
  • trail: True Stories: Tales from a Hard City
  • Renault Clio
  • Safeway
  • Renault Clio
  • trail: Justice for Joy
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6 comments

  1. Steve Wright’s People Show was basically one of those Noel Edmonds Saturday night shows with a different DJ. His sidekick Richard Easter used to dress up as Pamela Anderson, I seem to remember. Probably more fun for him than us.

  2. My goodness, what bilge. There was something terribly comforting about that sort of line-up, though, and that was that you could watch (or do) something else, and feel ever so slightly above it all, knowing that most of the telly-watching population were tuning in. Then when people stopped watching live TV altogether, even that was no longer possible. Remember when we all used to do the same thing at the same time? Pavlov’s Britain…

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